If you have a high concentration of tiny red or brown bumps clumped together on your arms, upper thighs, bum or even your cheeks – chances are you have Keratosis Pilaris (KP). You’re not alone, a staggering one out of every two of us battle with KP in our adolescence and early adulthood.

What is Keratosis Pilaris?

You may know it as ‘Chicken Skin’ down to the visual similarities KP shares with a freshly plucked chicken – Lovely, I know! Keratosis Pilaris is caused by the body over producing keratin, a hair protein found in the skin. This keratin build-up blocks the hair follicles causing small bumps to appear where the hair can’t push through the skin.

What Makes Keratosis Pilaris Worse?

  • The winter months
  • Dry skin
  • Shaving/Waxing
  • Being out of hormonal balance - high oestrogen levels
  • Pregnancy
  • Picking at the bumps

Usually Keratosis Pilaris causes no physical discomfort or itchiness, but it’s easy to become self-conscious when wearing strappy tops and bikinis. By the time you reach your thirties, Keratosis Pilaris normally takes care of itself, leaving you bump free. But if you don’t want to wait (and who does!) what can you do to help?

Exfoliate

But don’t overdo it! One to two times per week use a gentle sugar-based scrub – try out our fabulous Goji Berry Facial Scrub (ideal for your body too) – polish over your problem area in small circular motions. Remember, let the scrub do the work, you’re not sanding down wood.

Moisturise

Flax Seed Oil Skin Serum - Fantastic at deeply moisturising the affected area, helping to visibly lessen the bumps, leaving your skin feeling smoother and softer. Apply a few drops of this fabulous serum to the affected areas and allow to absorb. Apply at least twice per day to clean dry skin for best results.

Dry skin tends to make Keratosis Pilaris worse, combat this with a consistent skincare routine that includes daily moisturising - you can't go wrong with any of our lovely, luxurious moisturisers. 

Have your say.  Please be nice and stay on topic

* Comments must be approved before being displayed.